Inspirational FIlmmakers


I feel profoundly blessed. I feel it’s a great privilege to make any motion picture.
- David O. Russell 

I feel profoundly blessed. I feel it’s a great privilege to make any motion picture.

- David O. Russell 


If my films don’t show a profit, I know I’m doing something right.
- Woody Allen

If my films don’t show a profit, I know I’m doing something right.

- Woody Allen


My films are intended as polemical statements against American ‘barrel-down’ cinema.
- Michael Haneke

My films are intended as polemical statements against American ‘barrel-down’ cinema.

- Michael Haneke


In a way, failing was always something that had to happen to me. Because you need to learn you can’t walk on water.
- Nicolas Winding Refn

In a way, failing was always something that had to happen to me. Because you need to learn you can’t walk on water.

- Nicolas Winding Refn


"Well, art is an act of violence. It is about penetration, about speaking to our subconscious and our moods at different levels."
- Nicolas Winding Refn

"Well, art is an act of violence. It is about penetration, about speaking to our subconscious and our moods at different levels."

- Nicolas Winding Refn

posted 1 year ago with 67 notes

AA: I imagine your films don’t necessarily have a typical script. Do you begin with an image? A situation? A character? How does a new film begin for you? 
CR: I do actually work with a very precise screenplay, actually like a Hitchcockian screenplay where everything is described. Basically it all comes from experience, from life. For example, this last film, Post Tenebras Lux, I had just finished my previous film; then, I had children and started building my house in the countryside. Of course, a lot of ideas and feelings developed. I tried to put all of those together in a form—that, in this case, certainly seems to be a strange form—but actually it has its own logic. It does make its own sense. Then I just build it up quite rapidly. I write my screenplays in two or three days. But I think about the films for a year or more. There are certain things, particular images—I want to be there, and I try to make a world for them. I write a screenplay that’s shot by shot, not a story. I write shots. I’m trying to visualize it, and then we go out and shoot the film. It’s a materialization process. For me, it’s as if the film already existed the moment I write it. [X]

AA: I imagine your films don’t necessarily have a typical script. Do you begin with an image? A situation? A character? How does a new film begin for you? 

CR: I do actually work with a very precise screenplay, actually like a Hitchcockian screenplay where everything is described. Basically it all comes from experience, from life. For example, this last film, Post Tenebras Lux, I had just finished my previous film; then, I had children and started building my house in the countryside. Of course, a lot of ideas and feelings developed. I tried to put all of those together in a form—that, in this case, certainly seems to be a strange form—but actually it has its own logic. It does make its own sense. Then I just build it up quite rapidly. I write my screenplays in two or three days. But I think about the films for a year or more. There are certain things, particular images—I want to be there, and I try to make a world for them. I write a screenplay that’s shot by shot, not a story. I write shots. I’m trying to visualize it, and then we go out and shoot the film. It’s a materialization process. For me, it’s as if the film already existed the moment I write it. [X]

posted 1 year ago with 15 notes

Your body of work seems to question the status of the erotic in the modern city. The sense of alienation that inhabits your characters is frequently augmented by libidinal repression. Certain of your films - Vive L’Amour, The River, What Time is it There? - conclude with failed or distorted realizations of sexual desire. How do you view the role of the erotic in these works?
I want to express the failure of erotic desire to be realized in contemporary urban space. I would like to make my films about disappearing, like The Skywalk is Gone [2002] and Goodbye Dragon Inn. The whole theatre is disappearing in that film! This subject is important to me because society changes so fast and everything disappears so fast - historical sites, culture. One day I walked to the area where Lee Kang-Sheng was selling watches [in What Time is it There?], and I realized that ‘the skywalk is gone.’ It happens in Asia like that, things just disappear. People in their forties have no way of finding traces of their childhood. Modern people are afraid of disappearance. Living in Taipei, for example, we constantly have to deal with compelling visual change. We ask the question: what do you love the most? Who do you love the most? You will lose them - it will happen in modern society. My films ask the question: how we can face the disappearance? The loss?

Your body of work seems to question the status of the erotic in the modern city. The sense of alienation that inhabits your characters is frequently augmented by libidinal repression. Certain of your films - Vive L’AmourThe RiverWhat Time is it There? - conclude with failed or distorted realizations of sexual desire. How do you view the role of the erotic in these works?

I want to express the failure of erotic desire to be realized in contemporary urban space. I would like to make my films about disappearing, like The Skywalk is Gone [2002] and Goodbye Dragon Inn. The whole theatre is disappearing in that film! This subject is important to me because society changes so fast and everything disappears so fast - historical sites, culture. One day I walked to the area where Lee Kang-Sheng was selling watches [in What Time is it There?], and I realized that ‘the skywalk is gone.’ It happens in Asia like that, things just disappear. People in their forties have no way of finding traces of their childhood. Modern people are afraid of disappearance. Living in Taipei, for example, we constantly have to deal with compelling visual change. We ask the question: what do you love the most? Who do you love the most? You will lose them - it will happen in modern society. My films ask the question: how we can face the disappearance? The loss?

posted 1 year ago with 76 notes

How did you first become involved in cinema? What about the cinematic form was particularly appealing to you?
My childhood really was a golden age for movies, in the ’60s and ’70s there was no other entertainment, all we had was movies. My grandparents were such fans they had to watch one movie a day. They lived in a small city in Malaysia where there were seven or eight huge theatres. [My grandparents] would sell noodles on the side of the street, and take turns to see movies; sometimes I double-shifted and saw the movie with each of them. Later I had to go back to my hometown, because my father found out I was just watching movies everyday.
[In college] I chose theatre without really knowing what difference there was between theatre and film. After graduation, I did theatre, experimental theatre, TV, but never thought would turn into film director. I didn’t know I would be here today.
Film really chose me, this type of film chose me. Unfortunately I don’t have a swimming pool, my films are more abstruse. (laughs) [X]

How did you first become involved in cinema? What about the cinematic form was particularly appealing to you?

My childhood really was a golden age for movies, in the ’60s and ’70s there was no other entertainment, all we had was movies. My grandparents were such fans they had to watch one movie a day. They lived in a small city in Malaysia where there were seven or eight huge theatres. [My grandparents] would sell noodles on the side of the street, and take turns to see movies; sometimes I double-shifted and saw the movie with each of them. Later I had to go back to my hometown, because my father found out I was just watching movies everyday.

[In college] I chose theatre without really knowing what difference there was between theatre and film. After graduation, I did theatre, experimental theatre, TV, but never thought would turn into film director. I didn’t know I would be here today.

Film really chose me, this type of film chose me. Unfortunately I don’t have a swimming pool, my films are more abstruse. (laughs) [X]

posted 1 year ago with 44 notes
MORE Unmitigated Works of Cinema on YouTube (Pt2)

sergeiparajanov:

Hey, the list kept growing as someone gave me a playlist of movies I could find on Youtube. I’ll be sure to cite their tumblr and playlist at the end.

FASSBINDER

TSAI MING-LIANG

JODOROWSKY

FRITZ LANG

KIM KI-DUK

LEOS CARAX

WOODY ALLEN

WONG KAR-WAI

OTHERS

Again, I’ll try to get more movies for you guys to enjoy but this and the previous list should be enough for now. Here’s the tumblr user that helped:dylzo If I tagged you I feel that you would appreciate the list more and help get it out there. 

Unmitigated works of Cinema on YouTube (free)

sergeiparajanov:

I’ve compiled a list of movies found on youtube. Feel free to add to the list :) 

This is all I’ve managed to get so far, and it’s enough to get you started. After watching a movie or two you can always find more in the related videos section. Please reblog so that others can get the opportunity to see these great films. I’ll add to the list when I find more movies and free time.

Great Channel to subscribe to: ART CINEMA